Andrew Wilson and Melanie Margalis Stop by the Set of Deck Pass Live presented by Xfinity

Andrew Wilson and Melanie Margalis Stop by the Set of Deck Pass Live presented by Xfinity


[MUSIC PLAYING] JEFF CUMMINGS: Welcome to Deck
Pass Live presented by Xfinity. We’re here at the
Toyota US Open, where racing is just
about finished here at the beautiful
McAuley Aquatic Center on the campus of Georgia Tech. I’m Jeff Cummings. And I’m Kaitlin Sandeno. And this has been
a great weekend. It really has. We’ve kind of got
our storylines for 2020 going up to the Olympic trials. A lot of the veterans
making some statements, but a lot of these
younger swimmers are saying, don’t count me out. I’m gonna be in the hunt for
for an Olympic spot next year. That’s what’s so exciting
this time of the year. We’re about six months
out, and anything can happen within those six months. But it’s not something that
has been taken lightly. This is something they’ve been
training for the last four years. And it’s finally getting
to be that time where that big shave and taper’s
coming, and that moment that you hope is just on for
that week at Olympic trials. And it really has to be on. And I think a lot
of these veterans are looking at some of these
up and comers and saying, I can’t just sit
back and just assume that I’m gonna make
an Olympic team, or just that my best
time is gonna make it. Because as they probably know– they were young when they made
their first Olympic teams– anything can happen. I think that’s what makes it
fun to watch Olympic trials. And one of those
athletes who is really gonna be in the hunt to
make the Olympic team is our first guest tonight. Was in the final
both breaststrokes at the world championships
in both breaststroke events, and had a great swim tonight
in the 200 breaststroke. And he’s one of our guests–
one of our top guests tonight, Andrew Wilson. Great to have you here. Yeah, it’s great to be here. So I know you’re probably
tired of hearing me say this every time I interview
you, but you guys don’t know the journey
this guy has had to being on the national team. Swam at Emory, a
Division III school, because that’s the only
school that wanted him at the time out of high school. I don’t even know if they
wanted me, to be honest. You’re taking me. But they got me. They got you. And now here you are
just a few years later making the finals of world
championships in two events. I mean, you have to look back
on this journey and say– I mean, how can you describe it? Yeah. I mean, honestly, I think
that a lot of the time I don’t, maybe, stop and think
about it as much as I should. It’s pretty crazy,
but honestly it’s just a testament to
the people I’ve had around me throughout the way. And I think that when my
career is all said and done, I’ll definitely look back and
reflect on it a little bit more. But right now, I’m just
trying to enjoy the process and see how far
I can go with it. So Emory only
a few miles away. What’s your favorite
part about being back in Atlanta this weekend? Definitely the restaurants. Atlanta’s got some awesome food. And just hitting all of
my favorite places is– I mean, I come into
Atlanta a good amount because I just need to hit
some of those restaurants. But whenever I’m
back, it’s great. What’s the one that you’re
like, I have to go there; I will not go home
until I eat there? Putting you on the spot. Yeah, there are a lot. So one of my favorite
places is Alon’s Bakery. It’s near Emory. They’ve got some
dangerously good cookies. So I had to stop there on
Thursday when I wasn’t racing and get a little carbo load in. Perfect. I have to put that on my list. That is really nice. And obviously, I mean, Athens
has really good food too. Do you guys– Yeah. You guys are really
close as a post-grad team. Do you guys go out to
eat a lot after workouts, or is it kind of like
you all go off and do your own separate little things? No, I mean, I think that one
of the things that really drew me to Georgia when I moved
there last year was how big and how close that group is. It makes it really, really
easy to want to get better and to want to go to
practice when you’ve got such a close group around you. So I think that– I mean, they’re not
just training partners, they’re gonna to be
lifelong friends. Right. And you talked about
stuff about life after swimming, which
may be next year or may be much later than that. But you graduated with
a degree in physics. Are you thinking that
there’s a career in physics, or do you want to do
something besides that? Yeah. So I started graduate school
at the University of Texas at Austin in 2017. But full-time mathematics
graduate school and full-time swimming
don’t really mix too well. So I put that on
hold until whenever I finish my swimming career. But I want to go back to school,
probably for applied math, and then I’ll see
where I go from there. How are you feeling with
different races that you put up this weekend– the 100
breast and 200 breaststroke? Are you happy with the
results that you had here? Yeah. I mean, I think that there’s
definitely mixed feelings for some of them. I think there were
places where I wanted to be a little bit better. But you know, overall,
given the amount of rest that we got coming in
here, I’m pretty happy. And I think it
gives me confidence going into the spring. I just love racing
long course, and I think that I’m in
the best position that I have been in December. So I’m just really
looking forward to the spring and summer. And the group of
breaststrokers you have there– we talked about this
last night with Nic Fink. I mean, you guys are probably
really pushing each other to places you probably
never thought were possible every day in workout. I mean, I know that’s
probably another reason why you went to Georgia. But you know, just
everyday workout, I’m sure you’re just thinking,
I could get my butt kicked, but that’s probably
a good thing. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I knew when
I got there that Nic was gonna be an awesome
training partner for me. Like you said, it’s good
to get your butt kicked every once in a while
and kind of remind you. And I also think it’s
helpful, because it makes it so that you can’t really,
like, take a day off. You know, you can’t go
to practice and be like, eh, I’m not feeling it today. I’m just gonna take it easy. You know, both of us
are really competitive. Both of us don’t like to lose. But I think that we all have
a really, really good working relationship. I mean, if you look at my and
Nic’s results from last season, I think for both of us it was
the best year of our careers. And I really don’t think
that’s a coincidence. I think that we each
want to see each other do as well as they can. And we’re teammates first
and competitors second. Yeah. Well, we were talking
before the show started, and you’re saying
something you’d like to do is be a stadium
announcer for pro sports. I think everybody agrees
you’ve got a great voice. And we might actually put
that to use a little bit later in the show. We might have you
introduce our next guest. Yeah, I’d love to. All right, so stick around. We’re gonna have you do that. But before we do that,
we’ve got to talk about another great race
that happened here today in the pool. Just kind of another
really great upset in the women’s 100 freestyle. Simone Manuel, the reigning
Olympic and world champion, was in lane five. And this lady was in late
number four, Erika Brown of Tennessee, a senior. And she has been very
good at short course. And look at this start
here on the left. And Simone has always been a
great starter on the right. But Erika just outdid
Simone on the start, and I think that’s what
really helped Erika. KAITLIN SANDENO: I had
a feeling that Simone was gonna come back. But no, she held on so strong. She had a very, very
impressive back half. And we were kind
of looking it up– she just came off a swim
meet not too long ago with her college team. So to come here and throw down
some great times long course, that’s got to do a lot
for her confidence. Any time you beat the
defending world record holder and Olympic
champion, you’ve got to be feeling pretty
good going into 2020. JEFF CUMMINGS:
Well I think she– you know, being up
against Simone Manuel, I think she looks like a racer. I can tell she’s a racer. And that really helps. And she’s definitely
gonna be someone that’s in the conversation
that very, very tight 100 freestyle at the
Olympic trials next year. So the Pro Swim Series is
gonna be kicking off in 2020. We’ve got four more meets
before the Olympic trials. And you see there the schedule. We’ve got Knoxville
in January, and we’re gonna have Des Moines in
March, Mission Viejo in April. Then we’re gonna wrap up the
Pro Swim Series in Indianapolis before everybody heads to
Omaha for the Olympic trials. And it’s gonna be
a great meet there. And joining me here on
the Deck Pass Life desk is my new guest, the CEO of
Streamline Brands, Matt Lane. Matt, thank you for joining us. Thanks for having me. So talk about this
partnership that Streamline has now with USA Swimming. Yes, it’s been in existence
for about a year now, and we had been working
with the Foundation– the USA Swimming Foundation. We decided to go
ahead and up our game and actually contribute to
the overall good of the sport and be an official swim school
provider of USA Swimming. JEFF CUMMINGS: Well,
talk about how– I mean, I’m swim
school owner myself. But talk about how
important it is to have swim schools across the country. So ultimately, everybody’s
got to learn to swim. Yes. And if you go
interview 10 parents, eight out of 10
parents will tell you it’s an important life skill. And so every one
of these athletes started by learning
how to swim, primarily from a safety point of view. Yes. And as that progresses,
ultimately many people find the lifelong
spirit of the sport and end up joining and enjoying
it for the rest of their life. But that safety is a
critical element of it. And this is something we
cannot stress enough, is yes, that’s what you want to do the
swim lessons for first of all. It’s not to get in the water
to try to be an Olympian. It’s learn to swim first,
have fun for the sport, and then kind of
see what happens. When you’re out there,
do you see these kids having that kind of enjoyment? Oh, absolutely. I mean, the two most important
words in our mission statement are safety and joy. And we picked those
words very carefully, because the joy of
swimming is truly lifelong, but the safety element
also is critical. JEFF CUMMINGS: And
something I noticed that was part of
Streamline Brands is this champions library. Tell us about that. Well, one of the things that’s
unique about the Streamline Brands family is we have several
different swim school brands. One of them is SwimLabs. And SwimLabs is all about giving
our students the opportunity to compare their stroke and
technique against the world’s best. And our library of
the world’s best, we call the champions library. So it’s all about not
only giving our students the opportunity compare,
but also helping these athletes continue
to build their notoriety and demonstrate the expertise
that they use every night when they race to
the world, basically. So we tape them in a confined
or controlled environment and allow our
students to do side by side comparisons
with Swim Labs tanks. Well, I’m sure that
champion library– I might have to go and look
at that champions library. I always need a little bit of
help every place I can get it. Of course. Matt, thank you so
much for joining me. Congratulations on the
partnership, and much continued success
moving forward. Thank you. Thank you very much. Appreciate it. So as we said, a
lot of the people that start in swim schools, they just
start out there to have fun. But eventually, they
become Olympians, and they get to swim
in a pool like this, which is where the 1996 Olympic
games were held, believe it or not. A lot of you probably
remember that meet. And after the
centennial Olympic games were awarded to the
city of Atlanta, the campus of Georgia
Tech was selected as the venue for the
aquatics competition and the building of a state
of the art swimming and diving stadium, as you see right there. On July 19th, 1996, the games
began as American swimming icon Janet Evans ran the last leg of
the torch relay in the Olympic Stadium before passing the flame
on to the legendary Muhammad Ali to light the cauldron. And in the pool,
the United States earned 26 medals,
half of them gold. And that was led by Amy
Van Dyken’s four trips to the top of the podium,
among many other athletes that really made America proud. And now, after the Olympics
this pool was renovated and now is the pool you
see right behind us now, where they have a lot
of great competitions. So now we’re back here
with Andrew Wilson. As we said, Andrew, we’re
gonna put you to work here. All right, I’m ready. All right, so
introduce our next guest. Ladies and gentlemen,
our next guest, the featherweight
individual medley champion of the world, Melanie Margalis! [LAUGHTER] JEFF CUMMINGS: I love it! I think Andrew’s got a future. I think that’s great. He practices every day. Every day? Every day. Is it just your name,
or the whole team? Just yours? Yeah, just me. Yep. I don’t know what
it is about my name. I don’t know. It ends in a vowel, so that’s
great, you can stretch it out. I just don’t know how I lasted
my whole life without anybody doing this, and now I
just have it every day. Like, why wasn’t this
happening to me every day? I don’t know. I know. Now, if this doesn’t
happen, something’s missing from your life. You’re not gonna
have a good day. I think that’s a
new superstition. He needs to go with
you everywhere you go. Yeah. He definitely
needs to do that. Well, great swims this weekend. Thank you. Double IM champion. I am sweep. Yeah. It was a lot of fun. There were some
really good races. Yeah, I’m sure at 200 IM
was a little bit unexpected– that last freestyle leg, you
and Alex Walsh battling it out. Yeah. I mean, that race
was the most fun I’ve had in a race in a while. And that race is what’s
gonna keep me going when I get back to training. That was so much fun. And I knew back in 2018– I knew that she was gonna
be one to watch out for, and she was really proved that. You had a really
successful year in general. What is your
highlight from 2019? Oh, gosh. I don’t know. That’s a hard one. Wow, you just made you
realize it’s the end of the– I know! Holy cow! Crazy! I mean, I think ending
the year on this note is probably the
highlight of the year. Yeah, you can’t
really beat that. And you actually–
the 200 IM, I keep harping on it, because it
was a really good swim. It was actually faster than you
swam at world championships, too. I mean, that’s got to give you a
lot of motivation for next year as well, because I know
that was probably– was that expected? Were you trying to go faster
than you did at worlds? No, I didn’t know. I didn’t know that
was gonna happen. I think that was just me
trying to keep up with Alex. She kind of took the race by
the horns and went for it. And I was like, oh
gosh, I’ve got to go! A little birthday birdie, a
teammate of yours, she told me you’re very passionate
about skin care. Let’s talk skin care. What is it about it
that you just love? I don’t know. I mean, right now,
I’ve been doing some stuff that’s not agreeing
with me, and I’m breaking out. So this is a bad time
to talk about it. But I think it’s a great
question, because parents and swimmers are always asking,
what do you do for your hair? What you do if your skin? So what works for you? I mean, for me personally, I– at meets, I have to put Aquaphor
on my face the whole time. And that’s the only way
that I don’t get dry, flaky skin at meets because
they crank up the chlorine. So to me, that’s my
main tip, is Aquaphor. KAITLIN SANDENO: We’ve
got to get you a sponsor. We’re all about finding
people sponsors. Yeah, Kaitlin’s all
about getting sponsors. Aquaphor for Melanie Margalis. She’s gonna be
an agent in her– I think you’d be a great agent. Thank you. Well, I’m here with two
great medley swimmers. Kaitlin was a great
medley swimmer, and Mel, you’re just a great swimmer. Besides being good
in all four strokes, what makes a great
individual medley swimmer? Her breaststroke. Because for me, that
was my weakness, and I was in such admiration
of your 200 breaststroke that you put together here. And for me, when I
was doing the IMs, I was like, all right,
breaststroke, fake it till you make it. With you, you’re like,
OK, yeah, breaststroke. And for me, I think
being a breaststroker. That’s my two cents. MELANIE MARGALIS:
I mean, for me, I think it’s just the strategy. Sometimes, some of your strokes
are gonna feel off and– JEFF CUMMINGS: Oh, gosh. Do you see that? KAITLIN SANDENO: You don’t
have any fun out there. I love it. You’re always so smiley. I absolutely love– MELANIE MARGALIS:
I am in a bad mood all the time at swim meets. KAITLIN SANDENO:
It seems like it. It really seems like it. JEFF CUMMINGS: So we’re looking
at tonight’s 200 breaststroke. And that’s you. You were second from
the bottom there. And obviously, the race was
going between Lilly King and Emily Escobedo. You know, you’re actually
putting in a good swim there, going in fourth
in this last turn here. Were you aware of what Emily
and Lily were doing out there, or were you just staying
in your own lane? MELANIE MARGALIS: I could
see a Lily a little bit on my pullouts, but that was it. I mean, they’re so
good at breaststroke. I let them do their
thing out there. But that’s the thing. It was such an
impressive field, and I thought that you hung
in there so well, and after you had just dominated
the 200 IM, the 400 IM. And you just looked
really strong and fresh. I was watching your
200 IM, and your legs coming home– you didn’t
even look fatigued. You just look awesome right now. Then you thrown down with
this 200 breaststroke field that was pretty stacked. You’re like, heh, I’m
gonna get fourth in this. So well done. Thank you. Thanks. It was fun. That was actually the
most fun ready room I had been in this weekend. It seemed like it. I mean, you guys–
well, I think there was a little bit of delay,
so you guys are like, cut the tension a little bit. Yeah. But what is the ready room
like at your international meets, though, because
you’re pretty, you know– Yeah, I mean, I try to
find someone I can talk to. Like, if I can talk to someone– KAITLIN SANDENO:
Who speaks English. Yeah. If I can talk to someone,
I’m gonna talk to them. Yeah, so that’s,
like, my main thing. I love being with another
American, because then I’m like, OK, I know that for
sure I can talk to them. I mean, obviously,
sometimes people get serious in those situations. I’m not one of them. KAITLIN SANDENO:
Oh, that’s funny you say that, because we heard
this rumor, for media day, that they were like, OK,
Melanie, be really serious. Get angry. And you could not hold
that face whatsoever. Yeah, I just can’t do it. Not your thing? Nah. Look at the camera. Be as serious as you can. One second! You lasted one second! I think that’s what
everybody likes about you. I mean, you make it fun,
you make it so exciting. But obviously, that switch
has to turn on at some point. When you step up on the blocks? Well, that’s weird because
I was watching the next races, and I was watching
them on the blocks. And I was thinking
that, you know, people are yelling when
you’re on the blocks. And I realized that’s actually
when everything shuts off for me. KAITLIN SANDENO: Because
you don’t hear them? Yeah. I feel like that is the time
that I get into my zone, is on the blocks. And it’s just me, and
I’m just about to race. Well, that makes sense. I mean, I couldn’t imagine– you have to at some point
be like, OK, let’s go. Let’s race. I’m hungry for this win. Yeah. You have to turn
it on at some point. Yeah. I mean, for me, I
think that we do so much thinking in practice. Like, all we do is think,
think, think all practice so that when we get
to these situations, we shouldn’t have to think. You know? I’d rather just be like,
OK, I’m just gonna dive in, and I’m gonna do
what I do every day. Fantastic. Well, you have one more
big meet with ISL finals, and then it’s the holidays. What do you have planned? All my family’s
coming to Florida. My brother just had
twin boys back in May, and they’re coming
for Christmas. I’m so excited. They’re so cute, and I’m
so obsessed with them. I can’t wait to see them. Auntie of the year. Melanie’s gonna be so
happy over the holidays. Yes, I cannot wait. Yeah. Well, send him our
congratulations. Yes, please do. We’re so happy to hear that. I will. That’s so great. Well, have a great
holiday season. Thank you. And we’re gonna
be looking forward to seeing what happens in 2020. You’re gonna go to all
the Pro Swim meets? I think so. I– Just get through
this year first. Yeah, yeah! Wrapping up 2019! Yeah, get through
all the training first, and then you could
start to think ahead. Some Christmas training. Ooh, yes, everybody’s
favorite time of the year. Yeah. Thank you, Melanie. All right, so I
hope all of you guys out there that are
watching who are swimmers have some great
holiday training. Put in the work now,
because you will be rewarded a little bit later. We speak from experience. You put in the work, and
the rewards will come. So work the hard out
there, and everybody, your dreams will come true. Thank you so much
for joining us here. Kaitlin, have a great,
great Christmas. KAITLIN SANDENO: Thank you. Happy, merry everything! Thank you all our
fans for watching us. It’s been an awesome,
great, amazing weekend in Atlanta, Georgia. Looking for to exciting times
ahead, and ’tis the season. JEFF CUMMINGS: Yeah. So 2020 begins with the Pro
Swim Series in Knoxville, and we’re gonna
to see you there. Thanks everybody for
joining us on Deck Pass Live presented by Xfinity. [MUSIC PLAYING]

1 thought on “Andrew Wilson and Melanie Margalis Stop by the Set of Deck Pass Live presented by Xfinity”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *